On-Site Magazine

RCCAO celebrate 10 years of success

By STAFF REPORT   

Construction Infrastructure LEED P3s

More than 90 industry leaders gathered to celebrate the tenth anniversary of the Residential and Civil Construction Alliance of Ontario in Toronto’s chic Distillery District earlier this month.

RCCAO was founded in 2005 as an alliance between labour and management groups to advocate for investment in infrastructure.

According to Executive Director Andy Manahan, one of the fundamental goals of RCCAO was to commission independent research reports which could then be used to influence government decisions around infrastructure and asset management.

Some of RCCAO’s reports over the years looked at:

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    • examining the building permit process;
    • Ontario’s Guide for Municipal Asset Management Plans in 2012;
    • promoted different ways to address deferred maintenance of municipally-owned bridges;
    • recommended better governance and funding for transit and transportation projects;
    • created an online soil-matching registry;
    • assessed the state of water and wastewater systems;
    • used leading-edge modelling to demonstrate how underinvestment will affect Canada’s future prosperity;
    • explored ways to improve the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment process;
    • analyzed the price implications of construction procurement practices.
    • RCCAO’s four-part video series “Take the Politics out of Transit Planning,” nominated for an Ontario Professional Planners Institute award, provided examples of where political interference  has thwarted our ability to deliver transit projects in a timely and cost-effective manner.

To celebrate 10 years of advocating for infrastructure investment, RCCAO published its 35th report in September to take a look at how megatrends — the scope and pace of technological change; urbanization, globalization and connectivity; our changing economy and workplaces; environmental and energy trends; new political and fiscal currents — are developing and how they will shape the future of Ontario’s infrastructure to 2030 and beyond.

Click here for details on this lastest report or download a copy of the document here

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