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Toronto and Region Conservation and Coca-Cola Canada Announce $500,000 to Clean GTA waters


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June 21, 2013 by Staff Report

Brian Denney, CEO of Toronto and Region Conservation, Nicola Kettlitz, President, Coca-Cola Ltd., Rick Portiss, Manager, Restoration and Environmental Monitoring, Toronto and Region Conservation, Hon. Jim Bradley, Minister of the Environment, Government of Ontario and John Guarino, President, Coca-Cola Refreshments Canada with their big catch at Tommy Thompson Park on the Leslie Street Spit. Toronto and Region Conservation and Coca-Cola Canada have partnered to restore nine hectares of the Park into a flourishing coastal wetland. CNW
Brian Denney, CEO of Toronto and Region Conservation, Nicola Kettlitz, President, Coca-Cola Ltd., Rick Portiss, Manager, Restoration and Environmental Monitoring, Toronto and Region Conservation, Hon. Jim Bradley, Minister of the Environment, Government of Ontario and John Guarino, President, Coca-Cola Refreshments Canada with their big catch at Tommy Thompson Park on the Leslie Street Spit. Toronto and Region Conservation and Coca-Cola Canada have partnered to restore nine hectares of the Park into a flourishing coastal wetland. CNW

Toronto and Region Conservation and Coca-Cola Canada have announced plans to turn waste into water. Coca-Cola Canada will contribute $100,000 per year over five years, to restore an area once used for industrial waste disposal into a healthy nine-hectare coastal wetland at Tommy Thompson Park on the Leslie Street Spit.

“We are excited to have Coca-Cola on board to help with our shoreline and wetland restoration work,” said Brian Denney, CEO, Toronto and Region Conservation. “Their support will go a long way in ensuring that fish and wildlife on Toronto’s waterfront continue to flourish.”

The project will help reduce contamination to approximately 1.4 million cubic metres of water, an amount equivalent to 18,000 average-sized swimming pools. Once restored, the wetlands will attract more fish, beavers, water birds and other wildlife and help them thrive in a clean, natural habitat. Restoration is scheduled to start in 2014.

What the project will do:

  • Establish a robust wetland habitat – cap the existing contaminated sediments to allow water to flow through the park and back into the lake. This will help create a natural habitat for more than 35 different ecological communities existing at the park;
  • Create and improve recreational opportunities – improve local fishing spaces; add three new trails for walking and running; and further develop the best location in Toronto for bird watching.

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